The Trial of Kathleen Sebelius

Deal W. Hudson
March 16, 2009

Late-term abortionist Dr. George Tiller will stand trial in Wichita beginning today, charged with 19 misdemeanor counts of failing to obtain a mandatory second, independent physician’s opinion to performing a late-term abortion. Tiller is accused of having a financial relationship with his partnered physician, Dr. Ann Kristin Neuhaus, who provided the second opinions. (Evidently, it’s not so easy to find another physician who agrees with the medical “necessity” of these procedures.)

Regardless of what happens to Tiller, there is no doubt that his trial will provide a constant reminder of his relationship to President Barack Obama’s nominee to head the Department of Health and Human Services, Gov. Kathleen Sebelius.

How close is Sebelius to Tiller, whose clinic in Wichita is nationally known for the availability of late-term abortions? As first discovered by Operation Rescue, Sebelius held a party honoring Tiller at the governor’s mansion in April 2007. Only Tiller, his wife, and clinic staff were present at the event.

Sebelius has also used her veto power to protect the legality of Tiller’s late-term abortion business. An April 2008 veto of a bill passed by the Kansas legislature protected Tiller and other late-term abortionists from private lawsuits. A year earlier, Sebelius vetoed another bill requiring explicit medical reasons for a late abortion, just as she has vetoed all legislation restricting abortion since she became governor.

Dr. Tiller has spent millions of dollars helping Sebelius and the Democratic Party through his ProKanDo PAC and non-profit. He spent $1.2 million in the 2006 election cycle alone. Much of Tiller’s money targeted pro-life attorney general Phil Kline, who has been the b�te noir obstructing the Sebelius/Tiller pro-abortion effort in Kansas.

For her part, Sebelius follows the template of the pro-abortion Catholic politician devised in the late 1960s by Rev. Robert Drinan, S.J. (among others). Like Kennedy, Pelosi, Kerry, et al., Sebelius claims, “My Catholic faith teaches me that life is sacred. Personally, I believe abortion is wrong.” She is a product of Catholic schools, including Trinity University in Washington, D.C. (also the alma mater of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi). In 2003, Trinity awarded both Sebelius and Pelosi honorary doctorates.

Her ordinary, Archbishop Joseph Naumann, has warned Sebelius several times of her infidelity to Church teaching. When she was nominated as head of HHS, Bishop Naumann called Obama’s choice “offensive” and wrote:

Because of her long history both as a legislator and governor of consistently supporting legalized abortion and after many months of dialogue, I requested Governor Sebelius not to present herself for communion.

Archbishop Raymond Burke, prefect of the Apostolic Signature in Rome, recently showed his solidarity by publicly stating his support for Archbishop Naumann’s view of Sebelius’s fitness for communion. “Whether Governor Sebelius is in the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, or in any other diocese, she should not present herself for Holy Communion because, after pastoral admonition, she obstinately persists in serious sin,” the archbishop said.

Sebelius has distanced herself from Dr. Tiller since his indictments were handed down. Through various surrogates, she has also tried to take credit for a drop in the Kansas abortion rate during the time she was governor. Archbishop Naumann has labeled that claim “dishonest.” Dr. Michael New, assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama, provides a definitive debunking of Sebelius’s abortion reduction claim.

After three days of jury selection, opening arguments in the Tiller case are scheduled to begin March 23. Each guilty verdict on the 19 counts could cost Tiller up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine, as well as his license to practice medicine.

The date for the Sebelius Senate hearings has not been set, and the Tiller trial makes the hearings more problematic. With the national spotlight on Tiller’s trial, much of that light will inevitably fall on Governor Sebelius, further illuminating her support for, and protection of, the late-term abortion procedure.

By Deal Hudson

Deal W. Hudson was born November 20, 1949 in Denver, CO, to Emmie and Jack Hudson, both native Texans. Dr. Hudson had an older sister Ruth, and eventually, a younger sister, Elizabeth. Emmie Hudson, Ruth Hudson and Elizabeth Hudson now live in Houston, TX; Jack Hudson passed away some years ago. The late Jack Hudson was a captain for Braniff Airlines in Denver at the time of Dr. Hudson’s birth. Later the family moved to Kansas City when his father joined the Federal Aviation Agency. From Kansas City, the Hudson family moved to Minneapolis, then to Massapequa, NY, and finally to Alexandria, VA, where they first occupied a home overlooking the Potomac River adjacent to the Mount Vernon estate. After a year, the family moved to a home on Tarpon Lane a few houses up the street from the Yacht Haven boat docks. Dr. Hudson attended Mt. Vernon Elementary School from grades 4 to 6 and has a special gratitude for the teaching of Mr. Hoppe who first told him was a ‘smart lad.’ Having moved with his family to Fort Worth, TX in 1960, Dr. Hudson attended William Monnig Junior High and Arlington Heights HS. In high school, Dr. Hudson was captain of the golf team, editor of the literary magazine (Guerdon), and performed the role of Peter in the ‘The Diary of Anne Frank’ during his senior year. Dr. Hudson graduated cum laude with a major in philosophy from the University of Texas-Austin in 1971 where his undergraduate advisor was Prof. John Silber. His teachers at the University of Texas included Prof. Louis Mackey and Prof. Larry Caroline. Dr. Hudson minored in both classics and English literature. Dr. Hudson lived in Atlanta from 1974-1989, where he attended Emory University, receiving a Phd from the Graduate Institute for the LIberal Arts. He also taught philosophy at Mercer University in Atlanta from 1980-89. In 1989 Dr. Hudson and his family left Atlanta when he was hired to teach philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx. Dr. Hudson taught at Fordham, and also part-time at New York University, from 1989 to 1994. Dr. Hudson first came to Atlanta in after graduation from Princeton Theological Seminary (PTS) with an M.Div. While at PTS, Dr. Hudson managed the Baptist Student Union at Princeton University and became its first director. Dr. Hudson also was licensed at a minister in the Southern Baptist Convention at Madison Baptist Church in Madison, NJ. Dr. Hudson’s primary area of study at PTS was the history of Christian doctrine which he pursued with Dr. Karlfried Froelich. In 1984 Dr. Hudson was received in the Catholic Church by Msgr. Richard Lopez, with the special permission of Archbishop Thomas A. Donnellan, at the chapel of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Cancer Home in Atlanta. Dr. Hudson has been married twenty-five years to Theresa Carver Hudson and they have two children, Hannah Clare, 23, and Cyprian Joseph (Chip), 15, adopted from Romania when he was three years old. The Hudson family has lived in Fairfax, VA for more than fifteen years, after having lived five years in Bronxville, NY and a year in Atlanta, GA, where Theresa and Deal were married.

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